Rainbow Film Festival – Celebrating Queer Pride Month

Dear Members of Wajood,

Greetings!!! We are pleased to let you know that The US consulate, in collaboration with the local NGO’s like Wajood Society and Suraksha is organizing a 2 day film festival. The schedule and venue details of the film festival can be found below. Please make yourselves available for the event!! We along with US Consulate would be looking forward to have your presence at the festival.

Please feel free to contact Mahesh or Vishal for further enquiries.

ENTRY IS FREE AND OPEN TO ALL

Venue Details: Annapurna International School of Film + Media (AISFM), Banjara Hills Road No. 2. – http://www.isfm.edu.in/

EVENT SCHEDULE –

Friday, July 27th

5:00 Welcome by Elizabeth Jones (Asst Public Affairs Officer at The US Consulate, Hyderabad) and Jayati (President, Wajood Society)

5:15 Film Screening: Prayers for Bobby

7:00 Discussion

7:15 Film Screening: Milk

9:00 Discussion. End program

Saturday, July 28th

5:00 Welcome by (Asst Public Affairs Officer at The US Consulate, Hyderabad) and Jayati (President, Wajood Society)

5:15 Film Screening: Stonewall Uprising

7:15 Brief Discussion

7:30 Boys Don’t Cry

9:30 Brief Discussion. End program

Plot summary of the movies that are to be screened are:

Prayers for Bobby:

Prayers for Bobby is the amazing true story of a mother torn between her loyalties, challenged by her faith, and moved by a tragedy that would change her life, and the lives of others, forever. Bobby Griffith (Ryan Kelly, Smallville) was his mother’s favorite son, the perfect all-American boy growing up under deeply religious influences in Walnut Creek, California. Bobby was also gay. Struggling with a conflict no one knew of much less understood Bobby finally came out to his family. Despite the tentative support of his father, two sisters, and older brother, Bobby’s mother, Mary (three time Academy Award nominee and Golden Globe winner Sigourney Weaver), turned to the fundamentalist teachings of her church to rescue her son from what she felt was an irredeemable sin. As Mary came closer to the realization that Bobby could not be “healed,” she rejected him, denying him a mother’s unconditional love, and driving her favorite son to suicide. Anguished over Bobby’s death, Mary finds little solace in her son’s poignant diaries, revelations of a troubled boy fighting for the love of his mother and God. Mary finally, and unexpectedly, reaches out to the gay community as a source of inspiration and consolation. For Mary Griffith, it’s the beginning of a long and emotional journey to her role as a vocal advocate for gay and lesbian youth. In 1996, twelve years after Bobby’s death, she was invited to address the Congress of the United States, establishing her as a major force in the fight for human rights. http://www.prayersforbobby.com/synopsis.php

Milk:

In 1977, Harvey Milk was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, becoming the first openly gay man to be voted into major public office in America. Academy Award winner Sean Penn stars as Harvey Milk in a film that charts the last eight years of Harvey Milk’s life. While living in New York City, he turns 40. Looking for more purpose, Milk and his lover Scott Smith (James Franco) relocate to San Francisco, where they found a small business, Castro Camera, in the heart of a working-class neighborhood that was soon to become a haven for gay people from around the country. With his beloved Castro neighborhood and beautiful city empowering him, Milk surprises Scott and himself by becoming an outspoken agent for change. He seeks equal rights and opportunities for all, and his great love for the city and its people brings him backing from young and old, straight and gay, alike – at a time when prejudice and violence against gays was openly accepted as the norm. With vitalizing support from Scott and new friends and volunteers, Milk plunges headfirst into the choppy waters of politics. Milk serves San Francisco well while lobbying for a citywide ordinance protecting people from being fired because of their orientation – and rallying support against a proposed statewide referendum to fire gay schoolteachers and their supporters; he realizes that this fight against Proposition 6 represents a pivotal precipice for the gay rights movement. At the same time, the political agendas of Milk and those of another newly elected supervisor, Dan White (Josh Brolin), increasingly diverge and their personal destinies tragically converge. Milk’s platform was and is one of hope – a hero’s legacy that resonates in the here and now.

Stonewall Uprising:

In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a popular gay bar in the Greenwich Village section of New York City. Such raids were not unusual in the late 1960s, an era when homosexual sex was illegal in every state but Illinois. That night, however, the street erupted into violent protests and demonstrations that lasted for the next six days. The Stonewall riots, as they came to be known, marked a major turning point in the modern gay civil rights movement in the United States and around the world.

Previous raids of the Stonewall Inn had resolved peacefully. Typically, after police made some arrests, the bar shut down, reopening for business just a few hours later. But the raid on June 28th was different: patrons at the Stonewall resisted arrest and the police quickly lost control of the situation. A crowd gathered on the street outside the Stonewall, forcing police to barricade themselves in the bar. Riot officers wearing helmets and armed with nightsticks descended on the scene. The violent protests and demonstrations that erupted that night continued for almost a week. This 90-minute film draws upon eyewitness accounts and rare archival material to bring this pivotal event to life.

Boys Don’t Cry:

Based on a true story, this drama was adapted from the life of Brandon Teena, born Teena Brandon, a woman who chose to live her life as a man and suffered tragic consequences as a result. In 1993, 20-year-old Brandon (Hilary Swank) leaves Lincoln, Nebraska for the nearby community of Falls City, where she sports a crew cut, favors jeans and boots, and is regarded as a man by most of the people in town. While Brandon’s friend Lonny (Matt McGrath) warns her that sexual outsiders aren’t looked upon kindly in Falls City, she develops a reputation for being something of a ladies’ man, and is soon living with a single mother named Candace (Alicia Goranson). But when Brandon meets teenage Lana (Chloe Sevigny), the two become romantically involved almost immediately. Brandon makes friends with Lana’s mother (Jeanetta Arnette) and a burly ex-con named John (Peter Sarsgaard). John and his buddy Tom (Brendan Sexton) run with a rough group of men who like to drink and carouse, and they accept Brandon as one of their own. However, when Brandon ends up in jail on a traffic violation, her secret comes out, and, while Lana stands by Brandon’s side, John and Tom feel betrayed — and their anger soon boils over into violence.

"Film Festival"

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